Country flags for UK, Spain, Germany, France, China and Italy Speedy Booker Partner Sites

Covid-19:

Change of plans due to Covid? No worries! We will waive our admin fee for any booking cancelled due to Covid. You can amend your booking for free and if you need to cancel most properties offer full refunds with 14 days’ notice. Please see our FAQs for more information.

Where:

from:

to:

on:

Guests:

No availability?

  • Availability is mainly in the summer vacation period (June, July, August, September), when students clear their rooms
  • Rooms typically become available two to three months in advance, so please revisit the website within that period if nothing is available now
  • Alternatively go to SpeedyBooker for more accommodation and travel ideas

 

Visitor accommodation in Nottingham University residences

Not just for students - anyone can book!

  • Staying in Nottingham University accommodation is a convenient and affordable way to visit Nottingham, home of the famous outlaw, Robin Hood
  • From traditional Grade 2 listed buildings, to state-of-the-art buildings, there is something for every visitor to the city
  • With centrally-located bed and breakfast (B&B) rooms it is a cost effective alternative to staying in a hostel or cheap hotel in Nottingham

Reviews for Nottingham

3.7
Based on 441 reviews
Room
3.4
Value
3.8
Food
3.6
Service
3.9
Overall
3.6
★★★★★
130
★★★★
200
★★★
89
★★
20
2

I was very pleased with the room facilities, especially the ensuite bathroom and the kettle and fridge. The daily cleaning of the room was good too. The staff were helpful at all times and I particularly liked the additional study spaces and common room areas.

(Review Of Southwell Hall, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham)

The room was great (certainly a step up from my Uni dorms a few years back) and overall I thought the food was very good on site. My niggles would be that the wireless proved rather flaky and I found it difficult to access a stable connection at times. Also, there was some inconsistency with staff serving food, with some enforcing rules that others were not.

(Review Of Southwell Hall, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham)

Excellent overall. Impressed with the tea coffee and biscuits and soaps supplied. Lovely campus and friendly staff at reception. Makes me want to be a student again!

(Review Of Newark Hall, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham)

The experience was fabulous. I am so impressed by the organisation and facilities provided. I am truly in love with the country. I hope i get another chance to visit again !

(Review Of Southwell Hall, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham)

I would have liked another pillow as the one provided was too soft. The food was limited if one does not eat meat. Otherwise, I found the staff and standard of service great.

(Review Of Southwell Hall, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham)

The room and general facilities were excellent. The staff on duty were exceptionally welcoming and helpful. However the room was not cleaned daily as the details claimed, the tea coffee facilities not refreshed. The lack of parking was a major drawback as access to the site would always be by car.

(Review Of Bonington Student Village (Campus Accommodation), Nottingham)

Very good service overall. I have mislaid a TomTom sat nav device somewhere between parking spaces opposite Rutland Hall or in the room. If it is found I would be very grateful for its return. 07977 578809.

(Review Of Rutland Hall, University Park, Nottingham)

Breakfast wasn't the best and coffee real issue. Would be good if you could pre buy dinner. Also the fact you needed a code to book for a university event really made booking a pain would be better if it could be a note that you could add as some people were not able to book when you still had rooms.

(Review Of Southwell Hall, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham)

The room was very warm (even warmer than outside) even though the heating was not on, and so it was difficult to sleep. Perhaps a fan could be put on the desk?

(Review Of Cavendish Hall, University Park, Nottingham)

Nottingham Visitor information

Nottingham University accommodation

The university has numerous accommodation halls spread throughout the city. The age of the accommodation varies, and is refurbished when required. It should be understood that the university halls are designed primarily for students: not children or for adults expecting a high level of luxury. However, with this in mind, the halls do meet level of comfort that we expect most visitors to be happy with, and we will welcome any feedback where this is not the case.

Dates of Nottingham's academic vacations

Rooms are available during the academic vacations:

Easter: mid-March to mid-April
Summer: early July to end-September
Christmas: early-December to mid-January

Nottingham visitor attractions

Nottingham is a vibrant city in the East Midlands with a great deal to occupy its visitors, whether shopping, eating out or taking in the cultural and historical attractions.

Getting to Nottingham

By Air
Nottingham is easily accessible from Nottingham East Midlands Airport, which is 13 miles away. A taxi costs £20 or there is a Skylink bus service to Nottingham City Centre every 30 minutes. Birmingham International and London Luton Airports are two-hour train rides to Nottingham. From Manchester Airport it takes about 2½ hours by train. Heathrow Airport is a one-hour ride with the Heathrow Express Train and the tube to London St Pancras mainline station, from where a train to Nottingham takes about two hours. Both Gatwick Airport and London Stansted Airport are three-hour train rides to Nottingham. National Express run coaches from all major UK airports to Nottingham (Broadmarsh Bus Station, in the city centre).

By Train
There are trains every hour from London St Pancras to Nottingham. Nottingham train station is adjacent to the city centre. UK train schedules can be accessed at www.nationalrail.co.uk.

By Car
Leave the M1 motorway at Junction 25 to join the A52 to Nottingham. Follow the signs to the city centre or, to get to the University, follow the A52 for about 10 minutes, then enter the roundabout next to the "Toby Carvery" restaurant and take the third exit into Woodside Road (A6464). The entrance to the University Park Campus is at the next roundabout, on your left.
 

History of Nottingham

Nottingham history

Nottingham: the historic city

At the heart of Nottingham City Centre is the Old Market Square. This large open space is the largest square in England and was refurbished in 2007. Folklore has it that it was in the Market Square where outlaw Robin Hood took advantage of an amnesty and won the coveted silver arrow in a contest devised by the Sheriff of Nottingham.

Nottingham has some truly magnificent architecture, buildings from a vast swathe of history stretching right back to the 1100s have been built in the City. Victorian Nottingham saw a building boom with many grand buildings being built owing to the City's 19th century importance. Architects such as Alfred Waterhouse, Thomas Chambers Hine and Watson Fothergill have all built spectacular buildings in Nottingham.

Why not stop for refreshment at The Old Trip to Jerusalem? Known as one of the oldest pubs in England (its painted sign states that it was established in 1189 AD), it sits at the foot of Castle Rock in Nottingham's city centre. According to local legend it takes its name from the 12th Century Crusades to the Holy Land: legend has it that knights who answered the calls of Richard I to join the crusades, stopped off at this watering hole for a pint on their way to Jerusalem.

Nottingham: the University

The University of Nottingham traces its origins to the founding of an adult education school in 1798. The foundation stone of the original University College Nottingham on Shakespeare Street was laid in 1877, with a speech by former UK prime minister, William Ewart Gladstone. This building was formally opened in 1881 by Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany.

One of the most celebrated alumnus of Nottingham is the novelist D. H. Lawrence. Nottingham has particularly strong links with Malaysia. Two Malaysian kings, as well as several Malaysian government ministers are graduates. Other prominent alumni include 2003 Nobel laureate Sir Clive Granger, 12 current members of the UK Parliament and numerous executives on the boards of top multi-national corporations.

This website uses cookies. Click here to read our Privacy Policy.
If that’s okay with you, just keep browsing. CLOSE