Country flags for UK, Spain, Germany, France, China and Italy Speedy Booker Partner Sites Interior of a university dormitory, including bed, a desk with chair and a small red sofa

WELCOME

Where:

from:

to:

on:

Guests:

No availability?

  • Rooms are mainly available in the Christmas, Easter (March, April), and summer (June, July, August, September) vacation periods, when students clear their rooms, but limited availability does exist throughout the year
  • Rooms typically become available two to three months in advance, so please revisit the website within that period if nothing is available now, or visit our York Bed and Breakfasts website for more ideas

Bed and breakfast accommodation in the University of York

Not just for students - anyone can book!

  • B&B and self catering in central York
  • Stay in bright, modern University campus accommodation
  • Comfortable single, double and twin rooms available
  • Great alternative to a cheap York hotel, B&B or hostel

York Visitor information

York University accommodation

The university has numerous accommodation halls and colleges located on the Heslington Campus: over 200 acres of mature parklands around a central lake, situated just outside York's historic city walls. The age of the accommodation dates from 1963 and is refurbished when required. It should be understood that the university halls are designed primarily for students: not children or for adults expecting a high level of luxury. However, with this in mind, the halls do meet level of comfort that we expect most visitors to be happy with, and we will welcome any feedback where this is not the case.

Dates of York's academic vacations

Rooms are available during the academic vacations:

Easter: mid-March to mid-April
Summer: early July to end-September
Christmas: early-December to mid-January

York visitor attractions

York is renowned for its Roman, Viking, and Medieval heritage and the iconic York Minster. The city houses several museums including the National Railway Museum, the Jorvik Viking Centre, Clifford's Tower, and York Castle Museum. Lesser known attractions include Barley Hall, Fairfax House, Merchant Adventurers' Hall, the Mansion House, the Quilt Museum, and Treasurer's House. You can also enjoy guided walks of the city, boat trips on the River Ouse, and simply wandering through York's winding cobbled streets, the "Shambles".

Getting to York

The University of York is based just off the A64 South East of the City of York

By car from the A64: Turn off the A64 at the junction signposted York/Hull and head towards the City. You will pass B&Q on your right. Turn left at the next roundabout following signs for the University. You are now on site. Go right at the 1st and 2nd roundabout. Then turn left at the next two roundabouts. This will take you down Wentworth Way and into car park G, which is just outside the reception.

By car from the City: Leave the city following signs for Hull. At the traffic lights turn right, following signs for the University. At the first roundabout take a right, this will take you down Wentworth Way and into car park G, which is just outside the reception.
Car Parking is pay and display and is available 24hrs. 

By train: York has fantastic rail links across the country and booking in advance can provide great deals (www.thetrainline.com). The station is only 2 miles from the University of York and will cost around £6-8 in a taxi or you can catch the number 4 bus from outside the station which leaves every tens minutes directly to the University of York campus.

By Taxi: If you are arriving in a taxi, please ask for Wentworth College Reception. 

By Bus: The number 4 bus leaves from outside the railway station and the city centre every ten minutes. The bus takes 10-20minutes depending on traffic and sets of every 10-15 minutes both ways until around midnight. If you ask the bus conductor to let you know where the Wentworth stop is on the University of York campus, get off here and walk down the hill on Wentworth Way. The road goes around and will take you to Wentworth reception at the end. This is around a 5 minute walk.
 

History of York

York: the historic city

By the time of the Roman conquest of Britain, the area around York was occupied by a tribe known to the Romans as the Brigantes. The Brigantian tribal area initially became a Roman client state but later its leaders became more hostile to Rome. As a result the Roman Ninth Legion was sent north of the Humber into Brigantian territory.

The city itself was founded in 71 AD, when the Ninth Legion conquered the Brigantes and constructed a wooden military fortress on flat ground above the River Ouse close to its confluence with the River Foss. The fortress, which was later rebuilt in stone, covered an area of 50 acres and was inhabited by 6,000 soldiers. The site of the Roman fortress lies under the foundations of York Minster, and excavations in the Minster's undercroft have revealed some of the original walls.

During his stay in York, the Emperor Severus proclaimed York capital of the province of Britannia Inferior, and it is likely that it was he who granted York the privileges of a colonia or city. Constantius I died in 306 AD during his stay in York, and his son Constantine the Great was proclaimed Emperor by the troops based in the fortress.

The first Minster church was built in York for the baptism of King Edwin of Northumbria in 627. In 866, the Vikings raided and captured York. Under Viking rule the city became a major river port, part of the extensive Viking trading routes throughout northern Europe. The last ruler of an independent Jórvík, Eric Bloodaxe, was driven from the city in the year 954 by King Edred in his successful attempt to complete the unification of England.

In 1068, two years after the Norman Conquest of England, the people of York rebelled, only to by put down by William the Conqueror. He at once built two wooden fortresses on mottes, which are still visible, on either side of the river Ouse. The first stone Minster church was badly damaged by fire in the uprising and the Normans later decided to build a new Minster on a new site. Around the year 1080 Archbishop Thomas started building a cathedral that in time became the current Minster.

The city underwent a period of decline during Tudor times, and was the scene of bitter fighting in the Civil War of the 1640s. Following the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and the removal of the garrison from York in 1688, the city was dominated by the local gentry and merchants, although the clergy were still important. York's many elegant townhouses, such as the Lord Mayor's Mansion House and Fairfax House (now owned by York Civic Trust) date from this period, as do the Assembly Rooms and the Theatre Royal.

York: the University

The University of York was established in 1963, and has since expanded to more than thirty departments and centres, covering a wide range of subjects. In 2003 it attracted the highest research income per capita of any UK university. The university has built a reputation in less than half a century that places it among the top 30 universities in Europe. In the last Research Assessment Exercise in 2008, York was also named as the sixth best research institution in the United Kingdom.

Established as an alternative to Oxford and Cambridge, the University attracts a student body with a wide range of backgrounds, including a large number of internationals and a relatively high number of state school students in comparison to similar universities like those of Bristol and Bath according to The Times Good University Guide. Situated to the east of the city of York, the university campus is approximately 200 acres in size, incorporating the York Science Park and the National Science Learning Centre. Priding itself on its wildlife, renowned campus lakes and greenery, the institution also occupies grand buildings in the historic city of York. The university comprises eight colleges, which have similarities to the traditional colleges of the collegiate Universities of Oxford, Cambridge and Durham, which also provide halls of residence for students, all of whom are allocated to a college. In May 2007 the university was granted permission to build an extension to its main campus, on arable land just east of the nearby village of Heslington. The land was removed from the green belt especially for the purpose of extending the university.
 

Reviews For York

21%
49%
22%
6%
2%
Average Score

3.9

Based On 3689 Reviews
Room
3.8
Value
4.0
Service
4.0
Food
4.0
Overall
3.9

I enjoyed my stay in Franklin House. The room was warm and very comfortable. The staff that I met were very helpful, and breakfast was very generous!

(Review Of Franklin House, University of York)

A good place to stay if you want a peaceful location. 5 minutes from local shop by car. Excellent pubs to eat and drink at near by, and a good location to visit North York moors.

(Review Of Gingerlily)

I was very pleased with the room in which I stayed. It was comfortable, warm and clean. Breakfast was excellent with a good range of options. I was happy to have chosen Wentworth college as i believe some of my course colleagues had quite an unpleasent experience at some of the other university accommodation

(Review Of Wentworth College, University of York)

The room was a little cold and the radiator didn't work but overall v positive. There was a mix up with my room when I arrived but staff were helpful sorting it out.

(Review Of Vanbrugh College, University of York)

very clean and comfortable room.ideal for visiting york. we have already stayed here before so knew where to go ,but there are very few signs to tell you where to go . will definitely use this facility again.

(Review Of Franklin House, University of York)

Wasn't mad on the shower/wet room as I found it quite awkward and also I did request dark sheets due to a fake tan (fitness competition) but they were only small things and I did bring my own sheets in case! The room did take a while to warm up but overall was very very nice and extremely close to where I was competing so overall, very happy :)

(Review Of Franklin House, University of York)

very good accommodation, although ran out of toilet roll but otherwise very comfortable and quiet, mainly due to spring break holiday, didnt realise all the cafes and restaurants would be shut but managed to get a bus straightaway into York for breakfast. Overall would definately recommend staying on campus.

(Review Of Franklin House, University of York)

1. Was disappointed that only decaff coffee was supplied in the room, and James College reception was unable to provide any coffee or other supplies. 2. Night's sleep was badly disrupted by a party of American visitors drinking and shouting outside the block from 1am to 2.15am on night of 5.9.16 Apart from those comments, everything was very good.

(Review Of James College, University of York)

Didn't really know what to expect, but room was well equipped, included all the amenities you'd expect from a basic hotel, and breakfast offered an extensive choice. Would definitely choose to stay again.

(Review Of Franklin House, University of York)
This website uses cookies. Click here to read our Privacy Policy.
If that’s okay with you, just keep browsing. CLOSE