Cardiff cheap self catering accommodation | University Rooms

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Self-catering accommodation in Cardiff university halls

Not just for students - anyone can book!

  • Staying in Cardiff university summer accommodation is a convenient and affordable way to stay in Wales' capital city, with accommodation available in the very centre of Cardiff
  • These self-catering rooms are available in the summer vacation periods and are a great alternative to a Cardiff hotel or hostel

No availability?

  • Availability is mainly in the summer (June, July, August, September) vacation periods, when students clear their rooms
  • Rooms typically become available two to three months in advance, so please revisit the website within that period if nothing is available now
  • Alternatively you can visit our Cardiff Bed and Breakfast or Cardiff Hostels websites for more accommodation and travel ideas
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Reviews 

Cardiff UniversityRooms reviews

4.5 / 5.0

Based on 89 reviews
Service 4.6
Rooms 4.2
Food 0.0
Value 4.7
Overall Experience 4.5

I stayed in Senghennydd Hall for a week in July and loved absolutely everything about it. It's only a few minutes walk from the town center. The staff where not only very helpful but also really nice. When I noticed that my room was right next to the railway I was a bit worried about the noise, but turns out that the train can barely be heard through the closed windows and it does not run very often after 9pm. Senghennydd Hall will be my first choice if I'm ever lucky enough to return to Cardiff.
Miss Marie-Lyne B

Better value than a hotel as facilities (bathroom, bed etc) were very good. Better service than a backpacker's hostel - privacy, cleanliness, access, safety. Very good position - close to Cardiff CBD and tourist attractions eg Amgueddfa etc. Very easy to make a booking. Staff friendly and helpful.
Ms Elizabeth C

This is the second time we have booked in to University accommodation in the last two years. I know one of our party is going to email and complain, but she complains about everything, even if it's perfect! You get what you pay for. £30 a night is very good value. If I had to moan about anything, the person who met us when we arrived, was very nice and very helpful to us. I felt she was a little rude to some of the Chinese students who were staying there. I can understand there is a language barrier, but I thought it wasn't right. Although I will repeat she was very nice and helpful towards us. I was very happy with what was offered, and would definitely stay again, if we hold a weekend course in Cardiff.
Mr Nigel J

Info 

Cardiff Visitor information

Cardiff/

Cardiff is the largest city in Wales and its capital. The city is Wales' chief commercial centre, the base for most national cultural and sporting institutions, the Welsh national media and the seat of the National Assembly for Wales. Cardiff is a significant tourism centre and the most popular visitor destination in Wales.

The city of Cardiff is the county town of the historic county of Glamorgan. A small town until the early 19th century, its prominence as a major port for the transport of coal following the arrival of industry in the region, contributed to its rise as a major city.
Cardiff was made a city in 1905, and proclaimed capital of Wales in 1955.

Since the 1990s Cardiff has seen significant development with a new waterfront area at Cardiff Bay which contains the new Welsh Assembly Building and the Wales Millennium Centre arts complex. International sporting venues in the city include the Millennium Stadium (rugby union and football), SWALEC Stadium (cricket) and the newly opened Cardiff City Stadium. The city was awarded the European City Of Sport in 2009 due to its role in hosting major international sporting events.

Activities of interest in Cardiff

Cardiff is a lively and modern capital city, gaining popularity with tourists interested in its history and culture.

Designated a City of Sport for 2009, Cardiff offers world-class stadiums for rugby, football, cricket and athletics and an International Sports Village offering an Olympic size swimming pool, ice rink and an Olympic-standard Canoe Slalom.

There is a lively entertainment scene in and around Cardiff, with opera, ballet, musicals, art galleries and live music venues.

Getting to Cardiff

Cardiff is easy to reach from all parts of the UK and beyond due to good road, rail, bus and air links. Located on the M4 corridor, Cardiff is easily accessible by car and is well-served by rail services too, with frequent services to and from London as well as regular links to the rest of the UK. Regular bus and rail services link the centre of Cardiff to the valleys and South East Wales.

By Road: Travelling east on the M4. Leave the motorway at Junction 33 or 32 and follow signs. Travelling west on the M4. Leave the motorway at Junction 29, follow the A48(M)/A48 then follow signs.

By Rail: Cardiff Central Rail Station is situated next to the Central Bus/Coach Station.
For rail services throughout Wales - Arriva Trains Wales. Customer Relations: tel 0845 60 61 60. For all rail services throughout the UK - National Rail Enquiries. Tel. 08457 48 49 50 (24 Hours). www.nationalrail.co.uk

By Coach: National Express provide an extensive network of coach services. Telephone 08705 808080 for information. Coaches depart from Stand B2/B3 from Central Bus Station close to Cardiff Central Rail Station. www.nationalexpress.com

By Air: Cardiff Airport is situated at Rhoose, 12 miles south-west of Cardiff city centre and 10 miles from Junction 33 on the M4. For details of airport facilities, flights and travel to and from the airport you may wish to visit the official web site of Cardiff Airport - www.cwlfly.com

History 

Cardiff History

Cardiff/

Archaeological evidence from sites in and around Cardiff shows that Neolithic people had settled in the area by at least around 6,000 BP (Before Present), about 1,500 years before either Stonehenge or the Great Pyramid of Giza was completed. A group of five Bronze Age tumuli is at the summit of The Garth within the county's northern boundary. Four Iron Age hillfort and enclosure sites have been identified within Cardiff's present-day county boundaries, including Caerau Hillfort, an enclosed area of 51,000 metres squared.

King Edward VII granted Cardiff city status on 28 October 1905, and the city acquired a Roman Catholic Cathedral in 1916. In subsequent years an increasing number of national institutions were located in the city, including the National Museum of Wales, Welsh National War Memorial, and the University of Wales Registry Building—however, it was denied the National Library of Wales, partly because the library's founder, Sir John Williams, considered Cardiff to have "a non-Welsh population".

Cardiff: the universities

Cardiff University is located in the Cathays Park area of Cardiff, Wales. It received its Royal charter in 1883 and is a member of the Russell Group of Universities. The university is consistently recognised as providing the best university education in Wales. Cardiff University celebrated its 125th anniversary in 2008.

In 1931, the School of Medicine, which had been founded as part of the College in 1893 when the Departments of Anatomy, Physiology, Pathology, Pharmacology were founded, was split off to form the University of Wales College of Medicine. In 1972, the College was renamed University College, Cardiff.

On 1 August 2004 the University of Wales, Cardiff merged with the University of Wales College of Medicine. The merged institution separated from the collegiate University of Wales and officially took the name Cardiff University.

Cardiff Metropolitan University is made up of five Academic Schools: The renowned Cardiff School of Art & Design; The Cardiff School of Education - one of the leading providers of teacher training in the UK; The Cardiff School of Health Sciences - with the recently opened £4.9million research centre; The Cardiff School of Management - which offers the largest on campus MBA in the UKand its famous Cardiff School of Sport.

The roots of Cardiff Metropolitan University date back to the mid 1800s, however there have been some changes and Cardiff Met as it is today was established in 1996. In 2007 Cardiff Met was the first UK university to be awarded the Government's Charter Mark for Excellence for the 5th time. Cardiff Met has over 11,000 students from over 125 countries worldwide.

Famous Alumni

Cardiff University: Faisal al-Fayez (former Prime Minister of Jordan), Paul Atherton (television/film producer), Professor Robin Attfield (philosopher), The Rt Revd Gregory Cameron (Bishop of St Asaph), Dr Sheila Cameron QC (lawyer and ecclesiastical judge), Philip Cashian (composer), Gillian Clarke (poet), William Gareth Davies (Rugby footballer and chief executiveof Cardiff Rugby Football Club), Huw Edwards (journalist), Professor Sir Martin Evans (Nobel Prize for Medicine 2007), Glenys Kinnock (politician), Neil Kinnock (politician), Bernard Knight (crime writer).

Cardiff Metropolitan University: Olympic Gold medallist Lynn Davies CBE, TV Presenters Jill Dando and John Inverdale and former Welsh rugby union scrum-half Gareth Edwards CBE.

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Universities 

Universities in Cardiff

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