Country flags for UK, Spain, Germany, France, China and Italy Speedy Booker Partner Sites Interior of a university dormitory, including bed, a desk with chair and a small red sofa

BENVENUTI

Covid-19:

We are open for bookings and our properties have safety measures in place. Please see our FAQs for more information.

Dove :

da:

fino a:

su:

Ospiti:

Disponibilità

La maggior parte delle residenze universitarie hanno disponibilità tutto l’anno, mentre solo alcune di loro offrono alloggi nei mesi di vacanza, quando gli studenti non sono in sede.
Se sei uno studente in cerca di una sistemazione a lungo termine e non riesci a visualizzare la disponibilità delle residenze, contattaci e saremmo lieti di aiutarti.

Alloggi bed and breakfast all’università di York

Alloggiare alle residenze universitarie è un modo comodo ed abbordabile di soggiornare a York. Con queste stanze bed and breakfast (B&B) ben situate a partire da £45 per singole e £60 per stanze con letti gemelli, si tratta di un’alternativa conveniente ad allloggiare in un albergo o in un ostello.

York informazioni visitatori

York University accommodation

The university has numerous accommodation halls and colleges located on the Heslington Campus: over 200 acres of mature parklands around a central lake, situated just outside York's historic city walls. The age of the accommodation dates from 1963 and is refurbished when required. It should be understood that the university halls are designed primarily for students: not children or for adults expecting a high level of luxury. However, with this in mind, the halls do meet level of comfort that we expect most visitors to be happy with, and we will welcome any feedback where this is not the case.

Dates of York's academic vacations

Rooms are available during the academic vacations:

Easter: mid-March to mid-April
Summer: early July to end-September
Christmas: early-December to mid-January

York visitor attractions

York is renowned for its Roman, Viking, and Medieval heritage and the iconic York Minster. The city houses several museums including the National Railway Museum, the Jorvik Viking Centre, Clifford's Tower, and York Castle Museum. Lesser known attractions include Barley Hall, Fairfax House, Merchant Adventurers' Hall, the Mansion House, the Quilt Museum, and Treasurer's House. You can also enjoy guided walks of the city, boat trips on the River Ouse, and simply wandering through York's winding cobbled streets, the "Shambles".

Getting to York

The University of York is based just off the A64 South East of the City of York

By car from the A64: Turn off the A64 at the junction signposted York/Hull and head towards the City. You will pass B&Q on your right. Turn left at the next roundabout following signs for the University. You are now on site. Go right at the 1st and 2nd roundabout. Then turn left at the next two roundabouts. This will take you down Wentworth Way and into car park G, which is just outside the reception.

By car from the City: Leave the city following signs for Hull. At the traffic lights turn right, following signs for the University. At the first roundabout take a right, this will take you down Wentworth Way and into car park G, which is just outside the reception.
Car Parking is pay and display and is available at £5 for 24hrs. Parking is free between midnight on Friday and 8am on Monday morning.
PLEASE NOTE: UNTIL THE 26TH SEPTEMBER THERE ARE WORKS ON THE ROAD THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY. PLEASE FOLLOW PARKING INFORMATION SENT OUT WITH YOUR CONFIRMATION.

By train: York has fantastic rail links across the country and booking in advance can provide great deals (www.thetrainline.com). The station is only 2 miles from the University of York and will cost around £6-8 in a taxi or you can catch the number 4 bus from outside the station which leaves every tens minutes directly to the University of York campus.

By Taxi: If you are arriving in a taxi, please ask for Wentworth College Reception. This will cost £6-8 from the station or city centre.

By Bus: The number 4 bus leaves from outside the railway station and the city centre every ten minutes. The bus takes 10-20minutes depending on traffic and sets of every 10-15 minutes both ways until around midnight. If you ask the bus conducter to let you know where the Wentworth stop is on the University of York campus, get off here and walk down the hill on Wentworth Way. The road goes around and will take you to Wentworth reception at the end. This is around a 5 minute walk.
 

La storia di York

York history

York: the historic city

By the time of the Roman conquest of Britain, the area around York was occupied by a tribe known to the Romans as the Brigantes. The Brigantian tribal area initially became a Roman client state but later its leaders became more hostile to Rome. As a result the Roman Ninth Legion was sent north of the Humber into Brigantian territory.

The city itself was founded in 71 AD, when the Ninth Legion conquered the Brigantes and constructed a wooden military fortress on flat ground above the River Ouse close to its confluence with the River Foss. The fortress, which was later rebuilt in stone, covered an area of 50 acres and was inhabited by 6,000 soldiers. The site of the Roman fortress lies under the foundations of York Minster, and excavations in the Minster's undercroft have revealed some of the original walls.

During his stay in York, the Emperor Severus proclaimed York capital of the province of Britannia Inferior, and it is likely that it was he who granted York the privileges of a colonia or city. Constantius I died in 306 AD during his stay in York, and his son Constantine the Great was proclaimed Emperor by the troops based in the fortress.

The first Minster church was built in York for the baptism of King Edwin of Northumbria in 627. In 866, the Vikings raided and captured York. Under Viking rule the city became a major river port, part of the extensive Viking trading routes throughout northern Europe. The last ruler of an independent Jórvík, Eric Bloodaxe, was driven from the city in the year 954 by King Edred in his successful attempt to complete the unification of England.

In 1068, two years after the Norman Conquest of England, the people of York rebelled, only to by put down by William the Conqueror. He at once built two wooden fortresses on mottes, which are still visible, on either side of the river Ouse. The first stone Minster church was badly damaged by fire in the uprising and the Normans later decided to build a new Minster on a new site. Around the year 1080 Archbishop Thomas started building a cathedral that in time became the current Minster.

The city underwent a period of decline during Tudor times, and was the scene of bitter fighting in the Civil War of the 1640s. Following the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and the removal of the garrison from York in 1688, the city was dominated by the local gentry and merchants, although the clergy were still important. York's many elegant townhouses, such as the Lord Mayor's Mansion House and Fairfax House (now owned by York Civic Trust) date from this period, as do the Assembly Rooms and the Theatre Royal.
 

York: the University

The University of York was established in 1963, and has since expanded to more than thirty departments and centres, covering a wide range of subjects. In 2003 it attracted the highest research income per capita of any UK university. The university has built a reputation in less than half a century that places it among the top 30 universities in Europe. In the last Research Assessment Exercise in 2008, York was also named as the sixth best research institution in the United Kingdom.

Established as an alternative to Oxford and Cambridge, the University attracts a student body with a wide range of backgrounds, including a large number of internationals and a relatively high number of state school students in comparison to similar universities like those of Bristol and Bath according to The Times Good University Guide.[5] Situated to the east of the city of York, the university campus is approximately 200 acres in size, incorporating the York Science Park and the National Science Learning Centre. Priding itself on its wildlife, renowned campus lakes and greenery, the institution also occupies grand buildings in the historic city of York. The university comprises eight colleges, which have similarities to the traditional colleges of the collegiate Universities of Oxford, Cambridge and Durham, which also provide halls of residence for students, all of whom are allocated to a college. In May 2007 the university was granted permission to build an extension to its main campus, on arable land just east of the nearby village of Heslington. The land was removed from the green belt especially for the purpose of extending the university.
 

Revisioni per York

4,0
Basato su recensioni di 3566
Camera
3,8
Valore
4,0
Cibo
3,6
Servizio
4,1
Nel complesso
4,0
★★★★★
1661
★★★★
1339
★★★
454
★★
96
16

OVERALL VERY GOOD/EXCELLENT. MY ONLY CONCERN IS THAT THE SHARED TOILET WAS BLOCKED WITH TISSUE AND WOULD NOT FLUSH PROPERLY. I WOULD DEFINATLEY RECOMMEND THOUGH AND WOULD STOP AGAIN IN THE FUTURE.

(Revisione di James College, University of York) James College, University of York

The porters were excellent and service great-breakfast was outstanding. However I did book ensuite rooms and we were not allocated these- we had to share the loo and shower ( both immaculate) with another 3 rooms on quite a public corridor. We managed but had not packed for the 'shower run' so was not a great discovery.

(Revisione di James College, University of York) James College, University of York

There was only a tiny bit of toilet roll provided and had to walk to alcuin reception for more. Would have expected a better shower set up for a B and B (rather than student accommodation) ie a proper cubicle as the whole bathroom was soaked after a shower. Otherwise the room was fine and the breakfast was amazing!

(Revisione di Franklin House, University of York) Franklin House, University of York

24-hour check-in was much appreciated. I also was really happy to have phone access (with international calling card) in my room-- if it isn't already, that should definitely be mentioned in the description of the accommodation as it is a great amenity!

(Revisione di Wentworth College, University of York) Wentworth College, University of York

Bedroom was nice and clean, but bathroom a little less so (dirt/foot prints on floor, hairs etc.) Breakfast was excellent! This will likely be out of your control but on one night we had no sleep due to people hanging around outside the building. Extremely loud, singing and swearing and fighting etc. Again, it's likely out of your control but it did not make for an enjoyable first night!

(Revisione di Franklin House, University of York) Franklin House, University of York

Really fantastic. Room basic but clean and very good value for money. Within 30 mins walk of city center. Would be happy to stay here again. Great cooked breakfast included.

(Revisione di James College, University of York) James College, University of York

Paperwork did state that all rooms had a colour TV . Not the case. Only ground floor single rooms had a TV, we were allocated a 1st floor room. We were offerd this alternative, but not acceptable.

(Revisione di Wentworth College, University of York) Wentworth College, University of York

We had 5 rooms and everyone of them were clean, comfortable and well looked after. The facilities and breakfast were fabulous, I would have no hesitation in going back.

(Revisione di Franklin House, University of York) Franklin House, University of York

Very convenient location and fantastic breakfast. Only negative thing I would say is that the doors (probably being fire doors) are constantly banging throughout the day and night as people come and go so it was a disturbed nights sleep.

(Revisione di Franklin House, University of York) Franklin House, University of York
Questo sito usa cookies. Clicca qui per visualizzare la nostra polizza sulla privacy. Se sei d`accordo continua a navigare. CLOSE